History

Curriculum Information

Year 9 History 2018/2019

How will students be assessed?
Students will be assessed each half term on their ability to answer GCSE style questions. This will help them become GCSE ready and will assess their skills at analysing sources, interpretations and developing explanations.

In the summer term students will sit a 45 minute exam on WW1.

Half term Key content
1 (8 weeks) The Trenches in World War One
Introduction to source skills
Life in the Trenches
Case Study – Battle of the Somme (intro to essay skills)
Trench Diary
2 (7 weeks) Causes of World War 1
Propaganda and Enlistment – Why did men join up?
Intro to Holocaust
3 (6 weeks) Holocaust
Hitler’s rise to power
What was life like in Nazi Germany
4 (6 weeks) Causes of World War 2
Treaty of Versailles
Expansion of Germany
Appeasement
Was the USA right to drop the Atom Bomb?
5 (5 weeks) Civil Rights in the USA
Slavery
The impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction
The Jim Crow Era
6 (7 weeks) Lynching and the KKK
The Civil Rights Movement
Dr Martin Luther King Jr and Malcolm X
Assessment of change and continuity in the 21st Century

 

Year 10 History 2018/2019

Course title: GCSE History Exam board: AQA Specification code: 8145
How will students be assessed?
Students will sit two external exams at the end of Year 11. Each paper is worth 50% of their final GCSE grade. Both exams will be 1 hour and 45 minutes in length requiring students to answer source and own knowledge questions.

Paper 1: Section A will assess the period study (American 1840-1895: Expansion and consolidation). Section B will assess a wider world depth study (Conflict and tension in Asia: 1950-1975).

Paper 2: Section A will assess thematic studies (Britain: Health and people: c1000 to present). Section B will assess a British depth study (Norman England: c1055-c1100).

Half term Key content
1

8 weeks

Norman England c1066-c1100

Part one: The Normans: conquest and control: Causes of Norman Conquest, the death of Edward the Confessor, the claimants. Battle of Stamford Bridge; Battle of Hastings; Anglo-Saxon and Norman tactics; cavalry and castles. Establishing and maintaining control: the Harrying of the North; revolts, 1067–1075; King William’s leadership and government; William II and his inheritance.

Part two: Life under the Normans: Feudalism and government: roles, rights, and responsibilities; justice and the legal system, inheritance; the Domesday Book. Economic and social changes and their consequences: Anglo-Saxon and Norman life, towns, villages,  buildings, work, food, roles, Forest law.

2

7 weeks

Part three: The Norman Church and monasticism: Anglo-Saxon Church before 1066; Archbishop Lanfranc and reform, the building of churches and cathedrals; Church organisation and courts; Church-state relations; the wealth of the Church; relations with the Papacy; the Investiture Controversy.

·         Monasticism: the Norman reforms, the building of abbeys and monasteries; monastic life; learning; schools and education; Latin usage and the vernacular.

Part four: The historic environment of Norman England: A depth study of a Norman site

3

6 weeks

Britain: Health and people: c1000 to present  Impact of key factors (War, superstition/religion, chance, government, communication, individuals and role of science and technology)

Part one: Medicine stands still: Medieval medicine: natural, supernatural, Hippocratic and Galenic methods and treatments; the medieval doctor; training, beliefs about cause of illness. Christianity and medical progress and treatment; surgery; hospitals; Islamic medicine. Public health in the Middle Ages: towns and monasteries; the Black Death in Britain, beliefs about causes, treatment and prevention.

4

6 weeks

Part two: The beginnings of change: Impact of the Renaissance on Britain: challenges; Vesalius, Paré, William Harvey; opposition. Quackery; plague; the growth of hospitals; changes to the training and status of surgeons and physicians; the work of John Hunter. Prevention of disease: inoculation; Edward Jenner, vaccination and opposition to change.
5

5 weeks

Part three: A revolution in medicine: Germ Theory, Pasteur, Robert Koch, Pasteur and vaccination; Paul Ehrlich and magic bullets. Anaesthetics, Simpson and chloroform; antiseptics, Lister and carbolic acid; surgical procedures; aseptic surgery. Improvements in public health: cholera epidemics; the role of public health reformers; local and national government, the 1848 and 1875 Public Health Acts.
7

7 weeks

Part four: Modern medicine: Modern treatment of disease: the development of the pharmaceutical industry; penicillin, Fleming, its development; new diseases and treatments, antibiotic resistance; alternative treatments. Impact of war and technology on surgery: plastic surgery; blood transfusions; X-rays; transplant surgery; modern surgical methods, including lasers, radiation therapy and keyhole surgery. Modern public health: the importance of Booth, Rowntree, and the Boer War; the Liberal social reforms; the impact of two world wars on public health, poverty and housing; the Beveridge Report and the Welfare State; the NHS; costs, choices and the issues of healthcare in the 21st century.

 

 

Year 11 History 2018/2019

Course title: GCSE History Exam board: AQA Specification code: 8145
How will students be assessed?
Students will sit two external exams at the end of Year 11. Each paper is worth 50% of their final GCSE grade. Both exams will be 1 hour and 45 minutes in length requiring students to answer source and own knowledge questions.

Paper 1: Section A will assess the period study (American 1840-1895: Expansion and consolidation). Section B will assess a wider world depth study (Conflict and tension in Asia: 1950-1975).

Paper 2: Section A will assess thematic studies (Britain: Health and people: c1000 to present). Section B will assess a British depth study (Norman England: c1055-c1100).

Half term Key content
1 (8 weeks) Conflict and tension in Asia: 1950-1975

Part one: Conflict in Korea: Causes of the Korean War: nationalism; US relations with China; division of Korea; Kim Il Sung and Syngman Rhee; reasons why the North invaded the US and the UN responses; USSR’s absence from the UN. The UN campaign in South and North Korea; Inchon landings and recapture of South Korea; UN forces advance into North Korea; reaction of China and intervention of Chinese troops, the sacking of MacArthur.

The end of the Korean War: military stalemate around the 38th Parallel; peace talks and the armistice; impact of the Korean War for Korea, the UN and Sino-American relations.

Part two: Part 2: Escalation of conflict in Vietnam: The end of French colonial rule: Dien Bien Phu and its consequences; Geneva Agreement, 1954; civil war in South Vietnam; opposition to Diem; the Vietcong – aims, support, leadership and guerrilla tactics and Ho Chi Minh.

·         The US involvement: the Domino Theory; intervention under Eisenhower and Kennedy; Strategic Hamlets programme. Johnson’s War: the Gulf of Tonkin; the US response to Vietcong tactics; the mass bombing campaign; demands for peace and growing student protests in USA; My Lai and its impact; Search and Destroy tactics and impact; the Tet Offensive

Part three: The ending of conflict in Vietnam: Nixon’s War: Vietnamisation; chemical warfare; bombing campaign of 1970–1972; relations with China; widening of the war into Laos and Cambodia. Opposition to war: Kent State University; the importance of the media and TV in influencing public opinion; the context of the Watergate affair. The end of the war: the Paris Peace talks; the role of Kissinger; the US withdrawal; fall of Saigon; the price of conflict; problems of Vietnam in 1975.

2 (7 weeks)
3 (6 weeks) America, 1840–1895: Expansion and consolidation

Part one: Expansion: opportunities and challenges: geography, attitudes to Great American Desert; belief in ‘Manifest Destiny’. Why early settlers went west, the challenges they faced, Brigham Young and Mormons; the pioneer migrant farmers, the journey west; miners.

Dealing with a different culture: Plains Indians’ way of life; early American Government policy towards Plains Indians; Permanent Indian Frontier; changing relationship with Plains Indians.

Part two: Conflict across America: Increasing conflict on Plains: the Fort Laramie Treaty (1851) and failure of the policy of concentration; the Indian Wars (1862–1867): reasons for and consequences of the Wars; Sand Creek Massacre; Fetterman’s Trap. The background to the American Civil War: differences between North and South, slavery, westward expansion and free states abolitionism; breakdown of the Missouri Compromise, John Brown, the roles of Lincoln and Jefferson Davis; social and economic impact of the American Civil War on civilians.

Coming to terms with the Mormons: the Mountain Meadow Massacre and its aftermath.

Part three: Consolidation: forging the nation: The aftermath of the American Civil War: the 13th Amendment; Civil Rights Act; reconstruction in the South, 1866–1877; carpetbaggers; the balance of Federal and State powers. The continued settlement of the west: the Homesteaders, reasons for going west; government actions and laws; land and railroads; farming problems and solutions.The resolution of ‘the Indian problem’ after 1865: the small reservations policy; attitudes to the native Americans; Battle of the Little Big Horn; The Dawes Act; Battle of Wounded Knee; the closing of the frontier and its impact on native Americans

4 (6 weeks)
5 (5 weeks)

 

 

Year 12 History 2018/2019

Course title: A Level History Exam board: AQA Specification code: 7042
How will students be assessed? A-level students must take assessments in all three of the following components.

Component 1 Breadth study: Written exam, 2 hours 30 minutes, 3 questions, 80 marks, 40% of A-level.

Component 2: Depth study: Written exam, 2 hours 30 minutes, 3 questions, 80 marks, 40% of A-level

Component 3: Historical investigation (Personal study): Coursework, 3000–3500 words, 40 marks, 20% of A-level, marked by teachers, moderated by AQA.

Half term Key content:  Component 2O (Depth Study)

Democracy and Nazism: Germany, 1918–1945

Part one: the Weimar Republic, 1918–1933

Key Content: Component 1C (Breadth Study) The Tudors: England 1485 – 1603

Part one: consolidation of the Tudor Dynasty: England, 1485–1547

1 (8 weeks) The Establishment and early years of Weimar, 1918–1924 The impact of war and the political crises of October to November 1918; the context for the establishment of the Weimar Constitution; terms, strengths and weaknesses. The Peace Settlement: expectations and reality; terms and problems; attitudes within Germany and abroad. Economic and social issues: post-war legacy and the state of the German economy and society; reparations, inflation and hyperinflation; the invasion of the Ruhr and its economic impact; social welfare and the social impact of hyperinflation Henry VII, 1485–1509

Henry Tudor’s consolidation of power: character and aims; establishing the Tudor dynasty. Government: councils, parliament, justice, royal finance, domestic policies. Relationships with Scotland and other foreign powers; securing the succession; marriage alliances

2 (7 weeks) Political instability and extremism; risings on the left and right, including the Kapp Putsch; the political impact of the invasion of the Ruhr; the Munich Putsch; problems of coalition government and the state of the Republic by 1924 Society: churchmen, nobles and commoners; regional division; social discontent and rebellions

Economic development: trade, exploration, prosperity and depression

Religion; humanism; arts and learning

3 (6 weeks) The ‘Golden Age’ of the Weimar Republic, 1924–1928

Economic developments: Stresemann; the Dawes Plan; industry, agriculture and the extent of recovery; the reparations issue and the Young Plan

Social developments: social welfare reforms; the development of Weimar culture; art, architecture, music, theatre, literature and film; living standards and lifestyles

Political developments and the workings of democracy: President Hindenburg; parties ; elections and attitudes to the Republic from the elites and other social groups; the position of the extremists, including the Nazis and Communists; the extent of political stability

Henry VIII, 1509–1547

Henry VIII: character and aims; addressing Henry VII’s legacy

Religion: renaissance ideas; reform of the Church; continuity and change by 1547 Government: Crown and Parliament, ministers, domestic policies including the establishment of Royal Supremacy

 

 

4 (6 weeks) Germany’s international position; Stresemann’s foreign policy aims and achievements including: Locarno; the League of Nations; the Treaty of Berlin; the end of allied occupation and the pursuit of disarmament Relationships with Scotland and other foreign powers; securing the succession

Society: elites and commoners; regional issues and the social impact of religious upheaval; rebellion

5 (5 weeks) The Collapse of Democracy, 1928–1933

The economic, social and political impact of the Depression: elections; governments and policies

The appeal of Nazism and Communism; the tactics and fortunes of the extremist parties, including the role of propaganda

Hindenburg, Papen, Schleicher and the ‘backstairs intrigue’ leading to Hitler’s appointment as chancellor

Political developments: the Reichstag Fire; parties and elections; the Enabling Act and the end of democracy; the state of Germany by March 1933

 

Economic development: trade, exploration, prosperity and depression

Revision and Exam Prep.

 

6 (7 weeks) Key content

Component 3 NEA Historical investigation

A personal study based on a topic of student’s choice. This should take the form of a question in the context of approximately 100 years. It must not duplicate the content of options chosen for Components 1 and 2.

Lessons will cover key generic areas of topic choice, research skills, note taking, source evaluation, devising a question etc

 

 

 

Year 13 History  2018/2019

Course title: A Level History Exam board: AQA Specification code: 7042
How will students be assessed?  A-level students must take assessments in all three of the following components.

Component 1 Breadth study: Written exam, 2 hours 30 minutes, three questions (one compulsory), 80 marks, 40% of A-level.

Component 2: Depth study: Written exam,  2 hours 30 minutes, three questions (one compulsory), 80 marks, 40% of A-level

Component 3: Historical investigation (Personal study): Coursework, 3000–3500 words, 40 marks, 20% of A-level, marked by teachers, moderated by AQA.

Half term Progress checks on Component 3 will be made throughout.
1 (8 weeks) Key content:

Component 2: Democracy and Nazism: Germany, 1918–1945

Part one: the Weimar Republic, 1918–1933

Key Content

Component 1 (Breadth Study): The Tudors: England 1485 – 1603

Part 2 – England: turmoil and triumph, 1547–1603

 

2 (7 weeks) The Nazi Dictatorship, 1933–1939

Hitler’s consolidation of power, March 1933–1934: governmental and administrative change and the establishment of the one-party state; the Night of the Long Knives and the impact of the death of President Hindenburg.

The ‘Terror State’: the police, including the SS and Gestapo; the courts; extent, effectiveness and limitations of opposition and non-conformity; propaganda: aims, methods and impact; extent of totalitarianism.

Economic policies and the degree of economic recovery; Schacht; Goering; the industrial elites

Instability and consolidation: ‘the Mid-Tudor Crisis’, 1547–1563 (A-level only)

Edward VI, Somerset and Northumberland; royal authority; problems of succession; relations with foreign powers

The social impact of religious and economic changes under Edward VI; rebellion; intellectual developments; humanist and religious thought

Mary I and her ministers; royal authority; problems of succession; relations with foreign powers

3 (6 weeks) Social policies: young people; women; workers; the churches; the degree of Volksgemeinschaft; benefits and drawbacks of Nazi rule

The Racial State, 1933–1941

The radicalisation of the state: Nazi racial ideology; policies towards the mentally ill, asocials, homosexuals, members of religious sects, the Roma and Sinti

Anti-Semitism: policies and actions towards the Jews, including the boycott of Jewish shops and the Nuremberg Laws

The social impact of religious and economic changes under Mary I; rebellion; intellectual developments; humanist and religious thought

Elizabeth I: character and aims; consolidation of power, including the Act of Settlement and relations with foreign powers

The impact of economic, social and religious developments in the early years of Elizabeth’s rule

 

4 (6 weeks) The development of anti-Semitic policies and actions; the effect of the Anschluss; Reichkristallnacht; emigration; the impact of the war against Poland

The treatment of Jews in the early years of war: the Einsatzgruppen; ghettos and deportations

 The impact of War, 1939–1945

Rationing, indoctrination, propaganda and morale; the changing impact of war on different sections of society including the elites, workers, women and youth

 

The triumph of Elizabeth, 1563–1603

Elizabethan government: court, ministers and parliament; factional rivalries

Foreign affairs: issues of succession; Mary, Queen of Scots; relations with Spain

Society: continuity and change; problems in the regions; social discontent and rebellions

 

5 (5 weeks) The wartime economy and the work of Speer; the impact of bombing; the mobilisation of the labour force and prisoners of war

Policies towards the Jews and the ‘untermenschen’ during wartime; the Wannsee Conference and the ‘Final Solution’

Opposition and resistance in wartime including students, churchmen, the army and civilian critics; assassination attempts and the July Bomb Plot; overview of the Nazi state by 1945

Economic development: trade, exploration and colonisation; prosperity and depression

Religious developments, change and continuity; the English renaissance and ‘the Golden Age’ of art, literature and music

 

6 (7 weeks) Revision and exam prep.

 

The last years of Elizabeth: the state of England politically, economically, religiously and socially by 1603

Revision and exam prep.