Engineering

Year 9 Design and Technology 9 or 10 week module: Research and Design Task  

In Y9 Design and Technology students are taught together in mixed ability groups. The year 9 course develops a range of skills across all key areas of the DT curriculum and will prepare the students for options in any of the current or soon to be published Design & Technology courses

BTEC L2 Engineering

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition

GCSE Design & Technology with Graphic Products

GCSE Design & Technology with Resistant Material

GCSE Design & Technology with Textiles

Half term Key content
1 17th October data collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)
2 9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

9th February Parents’ Evening

3 3rd April data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
6          Week commencing 19th June: Year 9 exam week

26th June Data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

Week 1   Week 2 Week 3 Week 4            Week 5
Week 6 Week 7
Week 8
Week 9         
Students have one lesson per week
Introduction to engineering and famous engineers and the engineering world. Introduction to materials and proposed design brief Health and safety in the workshop, introduction to basic tools and machinery.Introduction to marking out – students transfer chosen design to material blank.Introduction to cutting tools and machinery.  Students safely remove waste from chosen design.Finishing and polishing. Students complete their proposed designStudents complete extension task related to surface finish using powder technologyStudents produce written document evaluating work completed in the workshopSelf-assessment

Year 10 Engineering 2016/2017

Course title: Engineering Unit 2: Engineered Product          Exam board:  BTEC          Specification code: 
How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments.

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks)  Unit Introduction
What is an Engineered Product
Student Product Disassembly and Photography

Begin Unit 2 Folder Task A

Technical specification for an engineered product

Analyse the engineered product you have been given/selected [delete as appropriate] and then produce a written technical specification for the engineered product. Your technical specification should include information under the following headings:
Basic

  • Form
  • Function
  • User requirements Advanced
  • Performance requirements
  • Material and component requirements
  • Ease of manufacture
  • Ease of maintenance
  • Legal and safety requirements

17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks) Task A Complete November 2016

Begin Task B

Research the engineered product you have been given/selected [delete as appropriate] and then produce a written report detailing the production processes used to manufacture the product’s components. The report should include the following information:

  • A description of the processes used
  • Why these processes were selected, with reference to the manufacturing needs of the product
  • The relative impact on the environment of the processes used, including energy, resources, waste production and pollution
  • A summary that weighs up the advantages and disadvantages of each process, based on the information provided in the earlier sections of the report
3 (7 weeks) Coursework production: Design project
Task B Complete – January 2017
Introduction to Manufacturing Processes (Injection Moulding) – 2 weeks
Begin Task C

Research the engineered product you have been given/selected [delete as appropriate] and then produce a written report detailing the production processes used to manufacture the product’s components. The report should include the following information:

  • A description of the processes used
  • Why these processes were selected, with reference to the manufacturing needs of the product
  • The relative impact on the environment of the processes used, including energy, resources, waste production and pollution
  • A summary that weighs up the advantages and disadvantages of each process, based on the information provided in the earlier sections of the report

9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  Task C Complete – March 2017
Batch Production Quality Control Task – 4 Weeks

Task D Introduction
QA and QC

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)
Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

5 (5 weeks)  Task D

Investigate quality control and quality assurance for your chosen engineered product. Using your product as an example, produce a written report that includes information on:

  • when, where and how QC checks are carried out and why these checks can help to improve the quality of your engineered product
  • why and how a specific QA system should be used during the manufacture of your engineered product and how the QC checks form part of this system
  • whether the QA system for your engineered product is fit for purpose
  • a summary that considers the strengths and weaknesses of the QC checks and QA system for your engineered product, based on the information provided in the earlier sections of the report.

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15th May-Friday 19th May

6 (7 weeks) Task D Submitted May 2017
Resubmission fortnight June 2017
Unit Complete – End of June 2017
Data Drop/Year 12 Reports begin Monday 3rd July – Mock Exam grade 2 to be entered here.

 

Course title: Engineering Unit 5: Engineering materials           Exam board: BTEC        Specification code: 
How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments.

Half term     Key Content
1 (7 weeks)                       Coursework production

  • Topic A1: Types of engineering materials  
  • Ferrous metals, e.g. low and medium carbon steels, high carbon steels, stainless steel and cast iron o applications include – cutting tools, e.g. drills (carbon steel), cutlery and medical instruments (stainless steel), castings and manhole covers (cast iron).  
  • Non-ferrous metals, e.g. aluminium, copper, zinc, brass, lead, titanium, tungsten carbide, superalloys (nickel-based and cobalt-based) and ceramics (boron carbide and cubic boron nitride) o applications include – aircraft components and kitchenware (aluminium), electrical wiring, cables and pipes (copper), anti-corrosion coatings and batteries (zinc), locks, gears, valves and door knobs (brass), building and construction, weights and radiation shielding (lead), aerospace, military, mobile phones and sporting goods (titanium), industrial machinery, tools and abrasives (tungsten carbide), aerospace and automotive components (superalloys), high performance mechanical and industrial applications, e.g. abrasive cutting tools, nuclear reactor control rods, anti-oxidant refractory mixes and tank armour (boron carbide, cubic boron nitride).  
  • Composite materials, e.g. plywood, glass reinforced plastic (GRP), medium density fibreboard (MDF) carbon fibre and Kevlar® o applications include – floors and roofing (plywood), boats, automobiles, hot tubs, water tanks, roofing, pipes and cladding (GRP), building material, e.g. furniture and kitchen cabinets (MDF), bicycle tyres, racing sails and body armour (Kevlar®).  
  • Thermoplastics, e.g. acrylic, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polythene (PET), polystyrene, nylon and polycarbonate o applications include – aquariums, aircraft windows and motorcycle helmet visors (acrylic), sewage pipes, plumbing pipes, clothing and upholstery, electrical cable insulation and inflatable products (PVC), packaging, e.g. plastic bags, plastic films and foam insulation (PET), disposable cutlery, plastic models, CD and DVD cases, disposable foam cups, smoke detector housings and insulation for packaging (polystyrene), bristles for toothbrushes, strings for musical instruments, threads, ropes, filaments, nets, hosiery and knitted garments (nylon), electrical and telecommunication components, domelights, flat/curved glazing, sound walls, sunglass/eyeglass lenses, lightweight luggage, computer cases and food/drink containers (polycarbonate).
  • Thermosetting polymers, e.g. formica, melamine, epoxy resin and polyester resin o applications include – kitchen worktops (formica), kitchen utensils and plates (melamine), moulds, laminates, casting, fixtures, coating and adhesives (epoxy resin), marine construction materials, automotive and aircraft components, luggage, furnishings, textiles and packaging (polyester resin).
  • Smart materials, e.g. shape memory alloys (SMAs), shape memory polymers, electrochromic, piezoelectricity, quantum tunnelling composite (QTC) o applications include – surgical equipment, dental braces, oil line pipes and eyeglass frames (SMAs), window frame seals, helmets, small scale surgical products (shape memory polymers), smart windows, information displays and eyewear (electrochromic), production and detection of sound, generation of high voltages, electronic frequency generation, ignition source for cigarette lighters and pushstart propane barbecues (piezoelectricity), electrically conductive clothing (QTC).

17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Topic A2: Properties of materials
  • Mechanical, e.g. density, tensile strength, shear strength, hardness, toughness/brittleness, malleability/ductility, elasticity and plasticity.
  • Electromagnetic, e.g. electrical conductivity, electrical resistance, paramagnetism/diamagnetism/ferromagnetism.
  • Chemical, e.g. resistance to corrosion and environmental degradation, reactivity.
  • Thermal, e.g. melting point, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion.
3 (7 weeks) Coursework production: Design project

  • Topic A3: Suitability of materials in engineering applications
  • Simple mechanical tests e.g. tensile/ductility test (loading a suspended wire specimen and recording the breaking load and amount of permanent extension), shear strength test (bench shears or tinsnips used to devise test), hardness test (centre punch, file or saw used to assess surface hardness or a test in which a hardened steel ball bearing is dropped from a given height and its rebound measured to assess surface hardness), impact test (striking a specimen held in a vice with a hammer and noting its effect). Topic A4: Heat treatment processes  
  • Processes that rely on heating to a certain temperature, time at that temperature, speed of cooling, for ferrous materials e.g. annealing, normalising, hardening, tempering, case hardening.

9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  Coursework production: Design project

  • Topic B1: Selection for applications Selection through activity, e.g. design, construction, manufacture, operations, or maintenance. Selection through use in a product, e.g. an engineered product consisting of multiple production methods and forms of supply, such as a bicycle or office chair.

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)
Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

5 (5 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Topic B2: Sustainable use of materials  
  • Raw materials extraction and processing.
  • Lower volatile organic compounds.  
  • Reducing material use.  
  • Reusing materials and products where applicable.
  • Recycling materials or using recycled materials
  • Waste management. .

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15th May-Friday 19th May

6 (7 weeks) Coursework production

  • Topic B3: Forms of supply  
  • Symbols, abbreviations and identification coding, e.g. International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO), British Standards Institution (BSI) materials coding system, suppliers’ and organisations’ colour codes.  
  • Material selection, e.g. bright drawn mild steel bar, solid diameters, pipe/tube diameters and wire gauges.  
  • Metal forms, e.g. bar stock, sheet materials, pipe/tube, wire, plate, rolled steel sections, pressings, castings, ingots, forgings and extrusions.  
  • Polymers/composite forms, e.g. sheet, pipe/tube, mouldings, powders, granules, resins and film.
  • Size, e.g. diameters, thickness and gauge.
  • Surface finish, e.g. bright drawn, cold drawn, plated, painted and plastic coated.

Data Drop/Year 12 Reports begin Monday 3rd July – Mock Exam grade 2 to be entered here.

Year 11 Engineering 2016/2017

Course title: Engineering Unit 1: The Engineered World           Exam board: BTEC           Specification code: 
How will students be assessed?
On Screen Test – Available on demand

Sat twice – October and March

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks) On Screen Test Revision

Topic A1: Engineering sectors and products

Types of products from the following engineering sectors:

● aerospace, automotive, communications, electrical/electronic, mechanical, biomedical, chemical.

Topic A2: Mechanical and electrical/electronic engineering processes

Processes including health and safety issues, characteristics, applications and advantages/disadvantages of the following engineering processes:

● machining – turning, milling, drilling
● forming – casting, forging
● fabrication – welding, shearing
● electrical/electronic – PCB manufacture, surface mount technology.

Topic A3: Scales of production

Characteristics and advantages/disadvantages of the following scales of production used in engineering manufacture:

● one-off/jobbing production

● batch production

● mass production

● continuous production.

Topic A4: Modern production methods

Applications and advantages/disadvantages of the following modern production methods for production/assembly lines:

● robots
● Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery.

17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks) Topic B1: Modern and smart materials in engineering

Applications, characteristics, properties and advantages/disadvantages of the following modern and smart materials used in engineering:

  • modern composite materials – glass reinforced plastic (GRP), carbon fibre, Kevlar®
  • modern high-performance materials – tungsten, titanium, superalloys (nickel based, cobalt based), ceramics (boron carbide, cubic boron nitride, zirconia)
  • smart materials – shape memory alloys (SMAs), shape memory polymers, electrochromic, piezoelectric actuators and transducers.

Topic B2: Modern material foams in engineering

Applications, characteristics and advantages/disadvantages of metallic foams as used in the automotive, biomedical and aerospace sectors e.g. aluminium, steel.

Topic B3: Modern material processes in engineering

Process, applications, characteristics and advantages/disadvantages of powder metallurgy: powder mixing/blending, pressing/compacting, sintering.

Topic B4: New technologies in engineering

Applications, characteristics and advantages/disadvantages of the following new technologies used in engineering sectors:

    • ●  optical fibres as used in the communications sector
    • ●  hydrogen fuel cells, surface nanotechnology and telematics as used in the automotive sector
    • ●  blended wing bodies as used in the aerospace sector
    • ●  bionics as used in the biomedical sector.
3 (7 weeks) Topic C1: Sustainable engineered products

Characteristics, applications and advantages/disadvantages of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) at the following stages for engineered products:

● raw materials extraction ● material production
● production of parts
● assembly

● use
● disposal/recycling.

Topic C2: Minimising waste production in engineering

Characteristics, applications and advantages/disadvantages of minimising waste production throughout the life cycle of engineered products, using the four Rs:

● Reduce materials and energy.

● Reuse materials and products where applicable.

● Recover energy from waste.

● Recycle materials and products or use recycled materials.

Topic C3: Lean manufacturing

Characteristics, applications and advantages/disadvantages of minimising waste at the production stage in engineering, using the following lean manufacturing techniques:

● Just-in-Time (JIT)
● Kaizen

● poka-yoke.

Topic C4: Renewable sources of energy in engineering

Processes, characteristics, applications and advantages/disadvantages of using the following renewable sources of energy in engineering:

● wind energy using turbines and wind farms
● solar energy using photovoltaic cells and solar water heaters
● hydro energy using dams, barrages and wave power

● geothermal energy using heat pumps and exchangers.

9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  On Screen Test – March

Completion of Outstanding Mechanical tasks unit

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)

Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

5 (5 weeks)  Task D

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15th May-Friday 19th May

6 (7 weeks)                
Course title: Engineering Unit 7: Machining techniques          Exam board: BTEC          Specification code: 
How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks)       Coursework production

  • Topic A1: Tools Tools for specific drilling and turning or milling techniques:
  • for drilling – simple tools, e.g. centre drill, drill bit; more complex tools, e.g. flatbottomed drill, counterboring tool, countersinking tool, reamer, tap  
  • for turning – simple tools, e.g. turning tools, facing tools; more complex tools, e.g. form tools, parting off tools, single point threading, boring bar, recessing tool, centre drill, twist drill, reamer, tap, die, knurling tool  
  • for milling – simple tools, e.g. face mills, end mills; more complex tools, e.g. slot drills, slotting cutters, slitting saws, profile cutters, twist drills, reamer, boring tools  
  • tooling materials – high-speed steel, cobalt steel, tungsten carbide, diamond.

17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Topic A2: Work-holding devices Work-holding devices for drilling and for turning or milling:  
  • for drilling – simple work-holding device, e.g. machine vice; more complex workholding devices, e.g. clamping direct to machine table, angle plate, vee block and clamps.  
  • for turning – simple work-holding device, e.g. three jaw chuck with hard jaws; more complex work-holding devices, e.g. four jaw chuck with hard jaws, centres (live or dead), faceplate, fixed steady or travelling steady  
  • for milling – simple work-holding device, e.g. machine vice; more complex workholding devices, e.g. clamping direct to machine table, angle plate, vee block and clamps, indexing head/device, rotary table.
3 (7 weeks) Coursework production: Design project

  • Topic B1: Features of the workpiece Use of drilling and turning or milling techniques for producing features in a workpiece:  
  • for drilling – simple features, e.g. through holes, blind holes; more complex features, e.g. flat-bottomed holes, counterbored holes, countersinking, reaming, tapping  
  • for turning – simple features, e.g. flat faces, parallel diameters; more complex features, e.g. stepped diameters, tapered diameters, drilled holes, bored holes, reamed holes, profile forms, internal threads, external threads, parting off, chamfers, knurls, grooves, undercuts  
  • for milling – simple features, e.g. flat faces, square faces; more complex features, e.g. parallel faces, angular faces, steps/shoulders, open-ended slots, enclosed slots, recesses, tee slots, drilled holes, bored holes, profile forms, serrations, indexed or rotated forms.

9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  Students revise for online assessment test.

Topic B2: Machining parameters Parameters for drilling and turning or milling techniques:
for drilling – positional, e.g. position of workpiece, position of tool in relationship to workpiece; dynamic, e.g. tooling revolutions per minute (speed), linear feed rate (feed), swarf clearance  

for turning – positional, e.g. position of workpiece, position of tools in relationship to workpiece; dynamic, e.g. workpiece revolutions per minute (speed), linear feed rate (feed), depth of cut for roughing and finishing, swarf clearance  

for milling – positional, e.g. position of workpiece, position of tools in relationship to workpiece; dynamic, e.g. milling cutter revs per minute (speed), linear/table feed rate (feed), depth of cut for roughing and finishing, swarf clearance.

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)
Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

5 (5 weeks)  Topic B3: Checks for compliance and accuracy Checks for accuracy relevant to drilling and turning or milling techniques: ●

for drilling – visual checks, e.g. workpiece to be free from false tool cuts, burrs and sharp edges removed; specific checks, e.g. dimensional tolerance equivalent to BS EN 22768-1 or BS 4500, surface texture 1.6μm (63 μin), reamed holes within H8, screw threads BS medium fit ●

for turning – visual checks, e.g. workpiece to be free from false tool cuts, burrs and sharp edges removed; specific checks, e.g. dimensional tolerance equivalent to BS EN 22768-1 or BS 4500, surface finish 1.6μm (63 μin), reamed or bored holes within H8, screw threads BS medium fit, angles within +/- 1.0 degree ●

for milling – visual checks, e.g. workpiece to be free from false tool cuts, burrs and sharp edges removed; specific checks, e.g. dimensional tolerance equivalent to BS EN 22768-1 or BS 4500, surface finish 1.6μm (63 μin), flatness and squareness within 0.125mm per 25mm, angles within +/- 1.0 degree.

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15th May-Friday 19th May

6 (7 weeks) Any work required for resubmission to be completed during the last few weeks the year group attends school.

Data Drop/Year 12 Reports begin Monday 3rd July – Mock Exam grade 2 to be entered here.

Year 12 Engineering 2016/2017

Course title: National Engineering Unit 2:
Delivery of Engineering processes safely as a team                             
Exam board:
BTEC
                Specification code:
How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments.

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Introduction

A1 Common engineering processes

  • Transforming ideas and materials into products or services

A2 Health & safety requirements

  • The general contents of legislation and regulations or other relevant international equivalents and how they are satisfied by safe systems of work/procedures.

A1 Common engineering processes

  • Common processes used to create engineered products
  • Common processes used in engineering service

  17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

A3 Human factors affecting the performance of engineering process

  • Understand that human factors affect the productivity of processes, including conformance to quality standards, reliability and safety of individuals.
  • Assignment
3 (7 weeks) Coursework production

 B1 Principles of engineering drawing

  • Attributes of orthographic projections
  • Drawing conventions or other relevant international equivalents

 9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  Coursework production: Design project

 B1 Principles of engineering drawing

  • Attributes of orthographic projections
  • Drawing conventions or other relevant international equivalents

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)
Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

 

Course title: Engineering Unit 17:Computer aided design           Exam board: BTEC         Specification code: 
How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments.

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Whole-class teaching: introduction to unit content, scheme of work and methods of assessment introduction to CAD systems class exercise on using the operating system to identify and activate CAD software, including the system requirements for running CAD software and the relationship between CAD and associated software packages. Individual practical activities: system configuration and setting up the drawing environment including the use of relevant toolbars and menus. Whole-class teaching: class exercise on individual hardware elements of a CAD system and an exercise comparing the use of CAD with other methods class exercise on the use of appropriate standards used in creating drawings, eg BS 8888, BS 3939, BS 2917.

17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Preparation for and carrying out Assignment 1: CAD Report (P1, P2, M1 and D1). Whole-class teaching/tutor demonstration: class exercise on alignment and presentation of views in 1st and 3rd angle projection systems and the use of standard drawing layouts class exercises developing CAD skills and using relevant use of navigation commands, eg absolute, relative and polar entry systems class exercises developing CAD skills and using relevant use of drawing commands, eg types of line, grids, snaps, circle, text, hatching, dimensioning, layers/levels class exercises developing CAD editing skills including fillets, chamfers, copying, rotating and scaling objects class exercises to produce, store, retrieve and modify CAD-generated drawings including circuit diagrams/ symbols.
3 (7 weeks) Coursework production: Design project

  • Whole-class teaching/tutor demonstration: individual class exercises on printing/plotting drawings using appropriate scale and paper size in order to produce hard copies of CAD-generated drawings of components and assemblies in 1st/3rd angle orthographic projection individual class exercises on editing and modification commands, eg array, copy, move, rotate, erase, stretch, trim, scale, chamfer and fillet, change layers, colours and line types.

9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  Coursework production: Design project

  • Preparation for and carrying out Assignment 2: CAD Portfolio (P3, P5, and M2). Whole-class teaching/tutor demonstration: individual class exercises to modify CAD-generated drawings including circuit diagrams and symbols and associated hardware used in circuit diagrams, eg hydraulic, electronic, electrical, pneumatic individual class exercises on interpreting the properties of an engineering component or circuit from a given CAD drawing.

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)
Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

5 (5 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Topic and suggested assignments/activities and/assessment Whole-class teaching/tutor demonstration: individual class exercises on using 3D tools to construct surface and solid models of engineering components individual class exercises on the use of appropriate scale and paper size in order to produce hard copies of 3D models.  

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15th May-Friday 19th May

6 (7 weeks) Coursework production

  • On completion of this unit students should know:
  • 1 Know the advantages of using CAD in comparison with other methods
  • 2 Know about the software and hardware required to produce CAD drawings
  • 3 Be able to produce and interpret CAD drawings
  • 4 Be able to use CAD software to produce 3D drawings and views.
  • Review delivery of unit and allow students opportunity to resubmit assignment for final assessment.

Data Drop/Year 12 Reports begin Monday 3rd July – Mock Exam grade 2 to be entered here.

 

Course title: Engineering Unit 27:Welding theory         Exam board: BTEC            Specification code: 
How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments.

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks)     Coursework production

  • Whole-class teaching: introduction to unit content and unit requirements introduction to welding processes range of welding processes covered in unit features of electric arc – relate to processes function of gas shields – relate to processes function of electrodes coverings and fluxes oxy-acetylene combustion and flame applications.
  • Workshop session: range of welding processes and the machinery involved – demonstrations and practice.

17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Preparation for and carrying out Assignment 1: Welding Processes (P1, P2, P3, P4, M1). Whole-class teaching/workshop sessions with tutor led demonstrations: effects of heat and process variables precautions to minimise effects prior to welding – joint design, pre-setting, pre-heating analysis of material behaviour during welding – materials structure, fusion, changes in structure etc effects of heat during welding – expansion, contraction, distortion, stress etc heat treatments for ferrous and non-ferrous materials comparison of processes with regard to heat effects
3 (7 weeks) Coursework production: Design project

  • Preparation for and carrying out Assignment 2: The Effects of Welding (P5, P6, P7, M2, D1). Whole-class teaching/workshop sessions with tutor led demonstrations: weldability of materials – material properties, chemical composition welding of similar and dissimilar metals heating effect and dilution of fused materials heating and cooling of materials – preheating and post heating welding process rate of heating and cooling restraint of materials during and after welding – rigid constructions and components.

9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  Coursework production: Design project

  • 3: Weldability of Metals (P8, M3). Whole-class teaching/workshop sessions with tutor led demonstrations: weld testing techniques – visual, destructive and non-destructive weld test theory and quality standards – variety of standards, tolerances, and dimensions, weld quality test procedures – visual, destructive and non-destructive.

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)
Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

5 (5 weeks)  Coursework production

  • safe practice for preparing joints and using equipment preparation of joints for testing testing of surface (visual) defects – undercut, cracking, craters, fillet leg length, excess weld, lack of fusion testing of welded joints – destructive and non-destructive testing techniques reporting results of weld tests.

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15th May-Friday 19th May

6 (7 weeks) Coursework production

  • Combined with a series of follow up practical tasks students  will produce a written report to demonstrate  their knowledge across a range of welding processes. Students will need sufficient knowledge to select appropriate processes for given applications. They will also need to know the physical features of those processes. Students will need to explain welding processes in terms of how the heat is input, and how the fusion of the material takes place to produce the weld.
  • The final document plus revisions will form the basis of their internal assessment.

Data Drop/Year 12 Reports begin Monday 3rd July – Mock Exam grade 2 to be entered here.

 

Year 13 Engineering 2016/2017

Course title: Engineering Unit 3: Engineering project                        Exam board: BTEC                   Specification code: 
How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments.

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Be able to keep records, specify a project, agree procedures and choose a solution
  • Project records: written eg notes, sketches, drawings; plans and modified plans; targets (setting, monitoring); use of planning tools eg paper based, electronic; recording initial concepts eg lists, notes, mind mapping, flow diagrams, sketches
  • Initial concepts: setting limits eg time, cost, feasibility, need; value–cost–benefit analysis; generating ideas eg group discussion, brainstorming, mind mapping; research techniques; lines of communication
  • Specification: type of project eg product design, plant layout/maintenance, production methods or similar engineering-related topics; technical information eg functionality, reliability, operational conditions, process capability, scale of operation, size, capacity, cost, style, ergonomics, present and future trends; health and safety issues; environmental and sustainability issues; quality standards and legislation; timescales; physical and human resource implications
  • Procedures: roles and responsibilities eg decision making, budget planning and control; reporting methods; resource allocation and limits
  • Techniques: comparison methods eg statistical, graphical, quality and resource requirements/limitations, process capability, fitness-for-purpose; analysis eg cost–benefit, feasibility

17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Be able to plan and monitor a project
  • Planning: long-term planning eg planners, charts and scheduling techniques (flow charts, Gantt charts, critical path methods, software packages); setting priorities; useful resource information eg human and physical
  • Monitoring: monitor and record achievement eg use of logbook and/or diary for record keeping (names, addresses, telephone numbers, meeting dates, email and other correspondence lists); use of logbook eg for recording and analysing data or performance records, modifying/updating charts/planners, recording project goals and milestones, initial concepts, project solution technical decisions and information
3 (7 weeks) Coursework production: Design project

  • Be able to implement the project plan within agreed procedures
  • Implement: proper use of resources eg equipment, tools, materials, within agreed timescale, use of appropriate techniques for generating solutions, adapting project plan where appropriate, maintaining appropriate records
  • Checking solutions: use of evaluative and analytical techniques eg graphs, matrix methods, statistics, Gantt charts, sequencing, scheduling, critical path methods, computer software packages

9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  Coursework production: Design project

  • Be able to present the project outcome
  • Presentation: deliver a presentation to a small group eg audience including known (peer group, tutors) and unknown (actual or simulated customer or client) participants; use of preparation techniques, presentation styles and techniques; preparation and use of visual aids eg overhead transparencies, software packages and projectors, charts, models, video/DVD clips
  • Project report: logbook/diary record of all events; written technical report including relevant drawings/ circuit diagrams, sketches, charts, graphs etc appropriate to the project solution; use of information and communication technology (ICT) as appropriate to present findings eg CAD, DTP, spreadsheets, databases, word processing

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)
Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

5 (5 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Although ongoing throughout the year students will have this dedicated time to manufacture proposed solution in order to meet the specification using suitable engineering materials.

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15th May-Friday 19th May

6 (7 weeks) Coursework production

  • Students to follow up on feedback from staff and peers regarding final presentation students hand in work for final assessment..

Data Drop/Year 12 Reports begin Monday 3rd July – Mock Exam grade 2 to be entered here.

 

Course title: Engineering Unit4 Mathematical principles            Exam board: BTEC                      Specification code: 
How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments.

Half term     Key Content
1 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Be able to use algebraic methods Indices and logarithms: laws of indices (am x an = am+n, a a a m n m n = − , (am)n = amn), laws of logarithms (log A + log B = log AB, log An = n log A, log A – log B = log A B ) eg common logarithms (base 10), natural logarithms (base e), exponential growth and decay Linear equations and straight line graphs: linear equations eg y = mx + c; straight line graph (coordinates on a pair of labelled Cartesian axes, positive or negative gradient, intercept, plot of a straight line); experimental data eg Ohm’s law, pair of simultaneous linear equations in two unknowns Factorisation and quadratics: multiply expressions in brackets by a number, symbol or by another expression in a bracket; by extraction of a common factor eg ax + ay, a(x + 2) + b(x +2); by grouping eg ax – ay + bx – by; quadratic expressions eg a2 + 2ab + b2 ; roots of an equation eg quadratic equations with real roots by factorisation, and by the use of formula.

17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Circular measure: radian; degree measure to radians and vice versa; angular rotations (multiples of π radians); problems involving areas and angles measured in radians; length of arc of a circle (s = rθ ); area of a sector (A = ½ r2 θ) Triangular measurement: functions (sine, cosine and tangent); sine/cosine wave over one complete cycle; graph of tan A as A varies from 0° and 360° (tanA = sin A/cos A); values of the trigonometric ratios for angles between 0° and 360°; periodic properties of the trigonometric functions; the sine and cosine rule; practical problems eg calculation of the phasor sum of two alternating currents, resolution of forces for a vector diagram Mensuration: standard formulae to solve surface areas and volumes of regular solids eg volume of a cylinder = π r2 h, total surface area of a cylinder = 2π rh + 2π r2 , volume of sphere = 4 3 π r3 , surface area of a sphere = 4 πr2 , volume of a cone = 1 3 π r2 h, curved surface area of cone = π r x slant height
3 (7 weeks) Coursework production: Design project

  • Data handling: data represented by statistical diagrams eg bar charts, pie charts, frequency distributions, class boundaries and class width, frequency table; variables (discrete and continuous); histogram (continuous and discrete variants); cumulative frequency curves Statistical measurement: arithmetic mean; median; mode; discrete and grouped data

9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  Coursework production: Design project

  • Differentiation: differential coefficient; gradient of a curve y = f(x); rate of change; Leibniz notation ( dy dx ); differentiation of simple polynomial functions, exponential functions and sinusoidal functions; problems involving evaluation eg gradient at a point Integration: integration as reverse of differentiating basic rules for simple polynomial functions, exponential functions and sinusoidal functions; indefinite integrals; constant of integration; definite integrals; limits; evaluation of simple polynomial functions; area under a curve eg y = x(x – 3), y = x2 + x + 4

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)
Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

5 (5 weeks)  Coursework production

  • review previous weeks’ work and summarise values of sine, cosine and tangent values (4 quadrant diagrams) then compare features of the three functions (periodic properties)
  • ● explain the use of the sine rule and conditions for solving non right angled triangles. Individual learner activities:
  • ● teacher-led solution of problems on triangular measurement.
  • ● teacher-led solution of practical problems (electrical and mechanical) involving the sine rule. Whole-class teaching:
  • ● explain the use of the cosine rule and conditions for use (eg where sine rule cannot be used)
  • ● explain and demonstrate the use of standard formulae to solve problems involving surface areas and volumes of regular solids.

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15th May-Friday 19th May

6 (7 weeks) Coursework production

  • Students to work through individual assignments.
  • Students submit assignment for assessment.

Data Drop/Year 12 Reports begin Monday 3rd July – Mock Exam grade 2 to be entered here.

 

Course title: Engineering Unit 5: Mechanical principles                Exam board: BTEC                                       Specification code:    
How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments.

Half term                  Key Content
1 (7     weeks)                                                                  Coursework production

  • 1 Be able to determine the effects of loading in static engineering systems
  • 2 Be able to determine work, power and energy transfer in dynamic engineering systems
  • 3 Be able to determine the parameters of fluid systems
  • 4 Be able to determine the effects of energy transfer in thermodynamic systems.
  • Be able to determine the effects of loading in static engineering systems Non-concurrent coplanar force systems: graphical representation eg space and free body diagrams; resolution of forces in perpendicular directions eg Fx = F cosθ, Fy = F sinθ; vector addition of forces, resultant, equilibrant, line of action; conditions for static equilibrium (Σ Fx = 0, Σ Fy = 0, Σ M = 0) Simply supported beams: conditions for static equilibrium; loading (concentrated loads, uniformly distributed loads, support reactions) Loaded components: elastic constants (modulus of elasticity, shear modulus); loading (uniaxial loading, shear loading); effects eg direct stress and strain including dimensional change, shear stress and strain, factor of safety

17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)                  Coursework production

  • Be able to determine work, power and energy transfer in dynamic engineering systems Kinetic parameters: eg displacement (s), initial velocity (u), final velocity (v), uniform linear acceleration (a) Kinetic principles: equations for linear motion with uniform acceleration (v = u + at, s = ut + ½at2 , v2 = u2 + 2as, s = ½(u + v)t) Dynamics parameters: eg tractive effort, braking force, inertia, frictional resistance, gravitational force, momentum, mechanical work (W = Fs), power dissipation (Average Power = W/t, Instantaneous Power = Fv), gravitational potential energy (PE = mgh), kinetic energy (KE = ½mv2 ) Dynamic principles: Newton’s laws of motion, D’Alembert’s principle, principle of conservation of momentum, principle of conservation of energy
3 (7 weeks) Coursework production: Design project

  • Be able to determine the parameters of fluid systems Thrust on a submerged surface: hydrostatic pressure, hydrostatic thrust on an immersed plane surface (F = ρ gAx); centre of pressure of a rectangular retaining surface with one edge in the free surface of a liquid Immersed bodies: Archimedes’ principle; fluid eg liquid, gas; immersion of a body eg fully immersed, partly immersed, determination of density using floatation and specific gravity bottle methods Flow characteristics of a gradually tapering pipe: eg volume flow rate, mass flow rate, input and output flow velocities, input and output diameters, continuity of volume and mass for incompressible fluid flow

9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  Coursework production: Design project

  • Heat transfer: heat transfer parameters eg temperature, pressure, mass, linear dimensions, time, specific heat capacity, specific latent heat of fusion, specific latent heat of vaporisation, linear expansivity; phase eg solid, liquid, gas; heat transfer principles eg sensible and latent heat transfer, thermal efficiency and power rating of heat exchangers; linear expansion; Thermodynamic process equations: process parameters eg absolute temperature, absolute pressure, volume, mass, density; Boyle’s law (pV = constant), Charles’ law (V/T = constant), general gas equation (pV/T = constant), characteristic gas equation (pV = mRT)

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)

Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

5 (5 weeks)  Coursework production

  • discuss displacement v. time and velocity v. time graphs for uniform linear motion and derive associated equations of motion explain Newton’s laws of motion and derive expression for inertial resistance explain and discuss the characteristics of dry frictional resistance, coefficient of kinetic friction and calculation of dry frictional resistance
  • explain the concept of dynamic equilibrium and application of D’Alembert’s principle define and derive expressions for work done, average power and instantaneous power disipation demonstrate solution of dynamic problems involving application of the equations for uniform linear motion, Newton’s laws and D’Alembert’s principle.
  • Individual activity: solve dynamic problems involving application of the equations for uniform linear motion, Newton’s laws and D’Alembert’s principle..

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15th May-Friday 19th May

6 (7 weeks) Coursework production

  • Students to work through individual assignments.
  • Students submit assignment for assesment.

Data Drop/Year 12 Reports begin Monday 3rd July – Mock Exam grade 2 to be entered here.

 

Course title: Engineering Unit 8:Engineering Design               Exam board: BTEC                Specification code: 
How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments.

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Describe the operation of the design process in an engineering company
  • Assignment
  • Interpret the requirements of a given customer and produce a product design specification.
  • Assignment

17th October data Year 12 collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Describe the appropriate legislation and standards which apply to the design of two different products.
  • Assignment
  • Describe the environmental sustainability and manufacturing constraints which influence the design of a given product
  • Assignment
3 (7 weeks) Coursework production: Design project

  • Produce design proposals which meet the requirements of a given PDS
  • Extract reference information from component manufacturers’ catalogues and materials and design databases

9th January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
Mock Exams 1: Tuesday 31st Jan-Friday 3rd Feb

4 (6 weeks)  Coursework production: Design project

  • Use a range of techniques to present a final design solution which meets the requirements of a given PDS and relevant legislation and design standards.
  • Assignment
  • Evaluate a final design solution against customer requirements and a PDS and suggest improvements.
  • Assignment

Year 12 Data Drop: 27th February (Mock Exam Results)
Year 12 Parents’ Evening: 16th March

5 (5 weeks)  Coursework production

  • Explain the possible impact of a poor customer design process on customer relationships and requirements
  • Assignment
  • Explain the importance of using a range of accurate design reference materials when developing design proposals
  • Assignment

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15th May-Friday 19th May

6 (7 weeks) Coursework production

  • Explain the issues which influence whether a design proposal should be developed into a final solution suitable for manufacture
  • Evaluate the impact of legislation and standards on the design process in relation to the profitability of the business

Data Drop/Year 12 Reports begin Monday 3rd July – Mock Exam grade 2 to be entered here.