Engineering

Year 9 Design and Technology 16 week module: Engineering

In Y9 Design and Technology students are taught together in mixed ability groups. The year 9 course develops a range of skills across all key areas of the DT curriculum and will prepare the students for options in any of the current or soon to be published Design & Technology courses

Technical Award in Engineering

Technical Award in Food & Catering

Technical Award in Materials Technology

Technical Award in Visual Communication

Technical Award in Fashion & Textiles

Half term Key content
1 (7 weeks) 16 October data collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)
2 (8 weeks) 31 October Tutor Evening
3 (5 weeks) 15 January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

29 January Option Evening

1 February Parents’ Evening

8  February Parents’ Evening

4 (6 weeks) 19 March data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)
5 (6 weeks)  
6 (7 weeks) Week commencing 18 June: Year 9 exam week

12 July Data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Lesson 3

Lesson 4

Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Lesson 7

Lesson 8 (& possibly 9)

Students have one lesson per fortnight over a 16 week period

Multi tool in Mild steel.

Introduction to 2D design software and set design brief . Hwk 1-Design task for case

Introduction to workshop safety and access to tools / equipment.

Marking out, cutting to a line, drilling and filing.

Marking out, cutting to a line, drilling and filing continued

Heat treatment of mild steel.

Polishing and ‘other surface treatments’ explored.

Finishing techniques based on previous lessons decision. Hwk 3-Evaluation

Finishing off tasks completed. Test and peer assessment.

 

 

Year 10 Btec Engineering Level 2

Course title: Btec Technical Award Engineering Exam board: Edexcel Specification code: 19327
How will students be assessed?
Component 1  = 30%  Exploring engineering sectors and design applications

Component 2 = 30%   Investigating an engineering project

Component 3 = 40%   Responding to an engineering brief

Students will respond to a series of set and approved assignments.  They will have 1 opportunity to improve upon the level.

 

Half term Key content
1 (7 weeks) Exploring engineering sectors and design applications.

 Learners will investigate a number of local employers via their website and respond to a series of set questions

During the term the students will explore the world of engineering through electronic media.

Term 1: 

Introduction the engineering sectors

explore the different sectors, products and interconnections within the industry

• investigate what various organisations and functions do, in addition to potential career paths
• discover more about the engineering design and manufacture processes
• build on their knowledge and practise engineering skills and techniques within mini-projects.

 16 October data collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (8 weeks)
3 (5 weeks) Term 2 -up to half term break: 

Introduction to material science

Skills based exercises demonstrating knowledge and understanding of how materials behave and how materials can be altered to meet a particular need.
This will be delivered through the production of a small hand clamp ’in ‘steel’.
Students will complete their electronic portfolio for component 1

 15 January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

4 (6 weeks) Term 2 -up to Easter break: 

Investigating an engineering project

Aim: explore the types of materials, components and processes used to make products, then reproduce and test a product.

During Component 2, students will:

• learn why engineers choose certain materials and components to make products
• investigate how products are made
• identify best practice when it comes to safety and risk management
• develop research, observation, recording, interpretation and measuring skills when reviewing an engineered product
• put what they’ve learned into practice when safely planning, reproducing and testing an engineered product.

19 March data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

5 (6 weeks) Term 3 – up to half term break

Students will complete their electronic portfolio related to component 2.

Students will also use this time to modify and resubmit component 1 n order to achieve a better grade

 19 April Parents’ Evening

6 (7 weeks) Term 3 – up to summer break

Students will investigate a small desktop appliance which can provide artificial light and store common stationery items.
They will use the knowledge and understanding gained from the previous two tasks to design and make a portable appliance.
They will need to incorporate, metal, polymers and low voltage electronics.
Students will then need to produce a written report outlining the design and make process.

Week commencing 18June: Year 10 exam week

12 July Data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

 

 

Year 11 BTEC ENGINEERING

Course title: Engineering Unit 7:

 Machining techniques

Exam board:

BTEC

Specification code:

 

How will students be assessed?
Coursework = 100% of unit

Students produce coursework that consists of individual assignments.

 

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks)   Coursework production

●        Topic A1: Tools Tools for specific drilling and turning or milling techniques:
●        for drilling – simple tools, e.g. centre drill, drill bit; more complex tools, e.g. flatbottomed drill, counterboring tool, countersinking tool, reamer, tap
●        for turning – simple tools, e.g. turning tools, facing tools; more complex tools, e.g. form tools, parting off tools, single point threading, boring bar, recessing tool, centre drill, twist drill, reamer, tap, die, knurling tool
●        for milling – simple tools, e.g. face mills, end mills; more complex tools, e.g. slot drills, slotting cutters, slitting saws, profile cutters, twist drills, reamer, boring tools
●        tooling materials – high-speed steel, cobalt steel, tungsten carbide, diamond.

25 September Reports Open

16 October data collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)   Coursework production

●        Topic A2: Work-holding devices Work-holding devices for drilling and for turning or milling:
●        for drilling – simple work-holding device, e.g. machine vice; more complex workholding devices, e.g. clamping direct to machine table, angle plate, vee block and clamps.
●        for turning – simple work-holding device, e.g. three jaw chuck with hard jaws; more complex work-holding devices, e.g. four jaw chuck with hard jaws, centres (live or dead), faceplate, fixed steady or travelling steady
●        for milling – simple work-holding device, e.g. machine vice; more complex workholding devices, e.g. clamping direct to machine table, angle plate, vee block and clamps, indexing head/device, rotary table.

14 December – 20 December  Mock Exams

3 (7 weeks)  Coursework production: Design project

●        Topic B1: Features of the workpiece Use of drilling and turning or milling techniques for producing features in a workpiece:
●        for drilling – simple features, e.g. through holes, blind holes; more complex features, e.g. flat-bottomed holes, counterbored holes, countersinking, reaming, tapping
●        for turning – simple features, e.g. flat faces, parallel diameters; more complex features, e.g. stepped diameters, tapered diameters, drilled holes, bored holes, reamed holes, profile forms, internal threads, external threads, parting off, chamfers, knurls, grooves, undercuts
●        for milling – simple features, e.g. flat faces, square faces; more complex features, e.g. parallel faces, angular faces, steps/shoulders, open-ended slots, enclosed slots, recesses, tee slots, drilled holes, bored holes, profile forms, serrations, indexed or rotated forms.

9 January data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

4 (6 weeks)   Students revise for online assessment test.

Topic B2: Machining parameters Parameters for drilling and turning or milling techniques:

  • For drilling – positional, e.g. position of workpiece, position of tool in relationship to workpiece; dynamic, e.g. tooling revolutions per minute (speed), linear feed rate (feed), swarf clearance
  • for turning – positional, e.g. position of workpiece, position of tools in relationship to workpiece; dynamic, e.g. workpiece revolutions per minute (speed), linear feed rate (feed), depth of cut for roughing and finishing, swarf clearance
  • for milling – positional, e.g. position of workpiece, position of tools in relationship to workpiece; dynamic, e.g. milling cutter revs per minute (speed), linear/table feed rate (feed), depth of cut for roughing and finishing, swarf clearance.

22 Feb Parents’ Evening

1 March Parents’ Evening

5 (5 weeks)  Topic B3: Checks for compliance and accuracy Checks for accuracy relevant to drilling and turning or milling techniques:

  • for drilling – visual checks, e.g. workpiece to be free from false tool cuts, burrs and sharp edges removed; specific checks, e.g. dimensional tolerance equivalent to BS EN 22768-1 or BS 4500, surface texture 1.6μm (63 μin), reamed holes within H8, screw threads BS medium fit
  • for turning – visual checks, e.g. workpiece to be free from false tool cuts, burrs and sharp edges removed; specific checks, e.g. dimensional tolerance equivalent to BS EN 22768-1 or BS 4500, surface finish 1.6μm (63 μin), reamed or bored holes within H8, screw threads BS medium fit, angles within +/- 1.0 degree
  • for milling – visual checks, e.g. workpiece to be free from false tool cuts, burrs and sharp edges removed; specific checks, e.g. dimensional tolerance equivalent to BS EN 22768-1 or BS 4500, surface finish 1.6μm (63 μin), flatness and squareness within 0.125mm per 25mm, angles within +/- 1.0 degree.

22 Feb Parents’ Evening

1 March Parents’ Evening

6 (7 weeks) Any work required for resubmission to be completed during the last few weeks the year group attends school.

23 April data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

Year 12 Engineering

Course title: Engineering Unit 1 Engineering principles 120GLH Exam board:

BTEC

Specification code:

601/7580/1

How will students be assessed?
Externally assessed through written exam.

The unit will be assessed through one paper of 80 marks lasting two hours that will be set and marked by Pearson.

Students will be assessed through a number of short- and long-answer problem-solving questions.

Students will need to explore and relate to the engineering contexts and data presented.

Assessment will focus on students’ ability to solve problems that require individual and combined

application of mathematical techniques, and electrical, electronic and mechanical principles to solve engineering problems.

The assessment availability is twice a year in January and May/June.

Sample assessment materials will be available to help students prepare for assessment.

 

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks)   Coursework production

A Algebraic and trigonometric mathematical methods

A1 Algebraic methods

• Indices and logarithms:

o laws of indices: am × an = am+namn, (am)n = amn
o laws of logarithms: logA + logB = logAB, logAn = nlogA, logA – logB = log A B
o common logarithms (base 10), natural logarithms (base e).

• Application to problems involving exponential growth and decay.

• Linear equations and straight line graphs:

o linear equations of the form y = mx + c
o straight-line graph (coordinates on a pair of labelled Cartesian axes, positive or negative gradient, intercept, plot of a straight line)
o pair of simultaneous linear equations in two unknowns.

• Factorisation and quadratics:

o multiply expressions in brackets by a number, symbol or by another expression in a bracket
o extraction of a common factor ax + ay, a(x + 2) + b(x +2)
o grouping ax ay + bx by
o quadratic expressions a2 + 2ab + b2
o roots of an equation, including quadratic equations with real roots by factorisation, and by the use of formula.

6 October data collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)   A2 Trigonometric methods

• Circular measure:

o radian
o conversion of degree measure to radian measure and vice versa
o angular rotations (multiple number (n) of radians)
o problems involving areas and angles measured in radians
o length of arc of a circle s = rθ
o area of a sector A = 1

• Triangular measurement:

o functions (sine, cosine and tangent)
o sine/cosine wave over one complete cycle
o graph of tanA as A varies from 0° and 360° confirming tanA = sin cosA
o values of the trigonometric ratios for angles between 0° and 360°
o periodic properties of the trigonometric functions
o the sine and cosine rule
o application of vectors:

– calculation of the phasor sum of two alternating currents
– diagrammatic representation of vectors
– resolution of forces/velocities.

UNIT 1: ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Engineering –

Specification – Issue 1 – February 2016 © Pearson Education Limited 2015 28

Mensuration:

o standard formulae to solve surface areas and volumes of regular solids

– volume of a cylinder V = πr²h
– total surface area of a cylinder TSA = 2πrh + 2πr²
– volume of sphere V = 43πr3
– surface area of a sphere SA = 4πr2
– volume of a cone V = 1/3 πr2h
– curved surface area of cone CSA = πrl

3 (7 weeks)  B Static engineering systems

B1 Static engineering systems

Recall, perform procedures, demonstrate an understanding of and analyse information

and systems, involving:

• Non-concurrent coplanar forces:

o representation of forces using space and free body diagrams
o moments
o resolution of forces in perpendicular directions Fx = Fcosθ, Fy = Fsinθ
o vector addition of forces – resultant, equilibrant and line of action
o conditions for static equilibrium ΣFx = 0, ΣFy = 0, ΣM = 0

• Simply supported beams:

o concentrated loads
o uniformly distributed loads (UDL).

• Reactions:

o support reactions
o pin reaction forces
o roller reaction forces.

B2 Loaded components

Recall, perform procedures, demonstrate an understanding of and analyse information and systems involving:

• direct stress and strain: direct stress σ = FA , direct strain ε = L

• shear stress and strain: shear stress τ = F/A, shear strainγ = a/b

• tensile and shear strength

• elastic constants: modulus of elasticity E = σ/ε; modulus of rigidity G =τγ

1 Feb  Mock Exams

4 (6 weeks)   C Dynamic engineering systems

C1 Dynamic engineering systems

Recall, perform procedures, demonstrate an understanding of and analyse information and systems involving:

• kinetic parameters and principles:

o displacement (s)
o velocity – initial velocity (u), final velocity (v)
o acceleration (a)
o equations for linear motion with uniform acceleration v = u + at, s = ut + 1
2
at2, v2 = u2 + 2as, s = 1

●        2 (u + v)t.

dynamic parameters and principles:

o force
o inertia
o torque (T)
o mechanical work W = Fs, mechanical power (average and instantaneous)
o mechanical efficiency
o energy: gravitational potential energy PE = mgh, kinetic energy KE = 1/2/mv2
o Newton’s Laws of Motion
o principles of conservation of momentum
o principles of conservation of energy.

• angular parameters:

o angular velocity (ω)
o centripetal acceleration a = ω²r =v2/r
o uniform circular motion power P = Tω
o rotational kinetic energy KE = 1

2

• lifting machines, including inclined planes, scissor jacks, pulleys:

o velocity ratio
o mechanical advantage
o effort and load motion friction effects.

26 Feb data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

6 March Parents’ Evening

5 (5 weeks) F Magnetism and electromagnetic induction

F1 Magnetism

Recall, perform procedures, demonstrate an understanding of and analyse information and systems involving:

• magnetic field:

o flux density
o magnetomotive force (mmf) and field strength (H), Fm = NI, H NI
o permeability
o B/H curves and loops
o ferromagnetic materials
o reluctance φ/m S = F
o magnetic screening
o hysteresis

• electromagnetic induction and applications:

o induced electromotive force (emf)
o relationship between induced emf, magnetic field strength, number of conductor turns and rate of change of flux
o relationship between number of turns, magnetic length, permeability, and inductance
o eddy currents
o principle of operation of electric motors and generators
o self inductance, including inductance of a coil, energy stored in an inductor, induced emf

Mock Exams 2: Monday 15 May-Friday 19 May

6 (7 weeks) D Fluid and thermodynamic engineering systems

D1 Fluid systems

Recall, perform procedures, demonstrate an understanding of and analyse information and systems involving:

• submerged surfaces in fluid systems:

o hydrostatic pressure and hydrostatic thrust on an immersed plane surface F = ρgAx
o centre of pressure of a rectangular retaining surface with one edge in the free surface of a liquid

• immersed bodies:

o Archimedes’ principle
o determination of density using floatation methods
o relative density

• fluid flow in a gradually tapering pipe:

o flow rate (volumetric and mass)
o flow velocities (input and output)
o input and output pipe diameters
o incompressible fluid flow (continuity of volumetric flow A1v1 = A2v2 and mass flow ρA1v1 = ρA2v2)

D2 Thermodynamic systems

Recall, perform procedures, demonstrate an understanding of and analyse information and systems involving:

• heat transfer parameters in thermodynamic systems – temperature, pressure, mass, linear dimensions, time, thermal conductivity and surface finish
• heat transfer processes – conduction, convection and radiation

11 June Reports Open

27 June – 3 July Exam Week

9 July data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

 

Year 13 Engineering

Course title:

Engineering Unit 3: Engineering project

Exam board:

BTEC

Specification code:

 

How will students be assessed?
This unit is assessed by a set task of 60 marks provided by Pearson and completed under supervised conditions. Learners will be given a case study two weeks before a supervised assessment period, to carry out three hours of independent preparatory research. The supervised assessment period is ten hours and can be arranged over a number of sessions within a three-week assessment period timetabled by Pearson. During the supervised assessment period, learners will complete a task that will require them to follow a standard development process of interpreting a brief, scoping initial design ideas, preparing a design proposal and evaluating their proposal.

Sample assessment materials will be available to help students prepare for assessment.

 

Half term Key Content
1 (7 weeks)   Coursework production

●        Be able to keep records, specify a project, agree procedures and choose a solution
●        Project records: written eg notes, sketches, drawings; plans and modified plans; targets (setting, monitoring); use of planning tools eg paper based, electronic; recording initial concepts eg lists, notes, mind mapping, flow diagrams, sketches
●        Initial concepts: setting limits eg time, cost, feasibility, need; value–cost–benefit analysis; generating ideas eg group discussion, brainstorming, mind mapping; research techniques; lines of communication
●        Specification: type of project eg product design, plant layout/maintenance, production methods or similar engineering-related topics; technical information eg functionality, reliability, operational conditions, process capability, scale of operation, size, capacity, cost, style, ergonomics, present and future trends; health and safety issues; environmental and sustainability issues; quality standards and legislation; timescales; physical and human resource implications
●        Procedures: roles and responsibilities eg decision making, budget planning and control; reporting methods; resource allocation and limits
●        Techniques: comparison methods eg statistical, graphical, quality and resource requirements/limitations, process capability, fitness-for-purpose; analysis eg cost–benefit, feasibility

18 September UCAS Data Drop

9 October- Reports open

16 October data collection (CWA,PEG and ATL)

2 (7 weeks)   Coursework production

●        Be able to plan and monitor a project
●         Planning: long-term planning eg planners, charts and scheduling techniques (flow charts, Gantt charts, critical path methods, software packages); setting priorities; useful resource information eg human and physical
●        Monitoring: monitor and record achievement eg use of logbook and/or diary for record keeping (names, addresses, telephone numbers, meeting dates, email and other correspondence lists); use of logbook eg for recording and analysing data or performance records, modifying/updating charts/planners, recording project goals and milestones, initial concepts, project solution technical decisions and information

12 December Parents’ Evening

3 (7 weeks)  Coursework production: Design project

●        Be able to implement the project plan within agreed procedures
●        Implement: proper use of resources eg equipment, tools, materials, within agreed timescale, use of appropriate techniques for generating solutions, adapting project plan where appropriate, maintaining appropriate records
●        Checking solutions: use of evaluative and analytical techniques eg graphs, matrix methods, statistics, Gantt charts, sequencing, scheduling, critical path methods, computer software packages

1 Feb- 5 Feb Mock exams

4 (6 weeks)   Coursework production: Design project

●        Be able to present the project outcome
●        Presentation: deliver a presentation to a small group eg audience including known (peer group, tutors) and unknown (actual or simulated customer or client) participants; use of preparation techniques, presentation styles and techniques; preparation and use of visual aids eg overhead transparencies, software packages and projectors, charts, models, video/DVD clips
●        Project report: logbook/diary record of all events; written technical report including relevant drawings/ circuit diagrams, sketches, charts, graphs etc appropriate to the project solution; use of information and communication technology (ICT) as appropriate to present findings eg CAD, DTP, spreadsheets, databases, word processing

26 Feb data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

5 (5 weeks)   Coursework production

●      Although ongoing throughout the year students will have this dedicated time to manufacture proposed solution in order to meet the specification using suitable engineering materials.

23 April data collection (CWA, PEG and ATL)

6 (7 weeks) Coursework production

●      Students to follow up on feedback from staff and peers regarding final presentation students hand in work for final assessment.